INTACT AMERICA AT AIDS 2010

Intact America takes its message abroad to the International AIDS 2010 Conference in Vienna, Austria from July 18-23. Brian O'Donnell and Aubrey Taylor at the 2010 AIDS ConferenceIntactivist volunteers are staffing our booth at the conference, with banners, brochures, and other educational materials from Intact America. Right now, the issue of AIDS – and the fact that circumcision does NOT prevent it – is central to both the CDC's and the AAP's upcoming recommendations for America's baby boys. Read the press release. UPDATE: We need your help to make our message heard. Will you make a donation to help support our presence at the AIDS 2010 conference in Vienna? (Pictured at right: Brian O'Donnell and Aubrey Taylor. Photo by Michael Smith.)

Circumcision and Sexually Transmitted Infections (including HIV)

Intact America opposes the promotion of circumcision as a method for the prevention of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases. Physicians and others who would promote circumcision have a long history of claiming medical benefits to justify genital cutting of both males and females that were subsequently disproved. HIV/AIDS is the latest in a long list of diseases that have held out as a justification for circumcision. It is socially irresponsible and dangerous to promote a message that circumcision offers protection from sexually transmitted infections, including HIV, when such protection – if it exists at all – Brian O'Donnell with Michel Sidibé, the new Executive Director of UN-AIDSis only partial, and comes at a great expense and risk to others. Circumcised men can both contract and transmit sexually transmitted infections. The only way to prevent such infections is through abstinence or “safe sex” practices, including the use of condoms. (Pictured at right: Brian O'Donnell with Michel Sidibé, the new Executive Director of UN-AIDS. Photo by Michael Smith.)

Male Circumcision: A Dangerous Mistake in the HIV Battle

Mass male circumcision has been identified and promoted as a method of curbing the HIV/AIDS pandemic in sub-Saharan Africa, following the results of three randomized clinical field trials (RCTs) conducted there. Analysis of these studies reveals many factors that call in to question the results claimed and limit their applicability to the circumcision debate in the United States. Our full analysis is available here.