"DO YOU KNOW?" WITH MARILYN MILOS: ARCHIVE

These informational essays are written by Marilyn Milos, RN, founder of the National Organization of Circumcision Information Resource Centers and a pioneer in the movement to end the forced circumcision of boys in the United States. Marilyn is also a member of Intact America's Steering Committee. If you have a question you'd like Marilyn to address, send us an email!

JANUARY 2016: Foreskin Closure —
The foreskin is a normal part of the penis. At birth, only one to two percent of baby boys have a fully retractile foreskin, while the remainder of intact males have foreskins that will become retractile — each in its own time.
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NOVEMBER 2015: Foreskin Restoration —
Infant circumcision is a primal wound that interferes with the maternal/infant bond, disrupts breastfeeding, and disturbs the baby's (and mother's) normal sleep patterns. In addition to this, male circumcision also affects the adult man's sexual partners. 
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JULY 2015: The Effects of Circumcision —
Infant circumcision is a primal wound that interferes with the maternal/infant bond, disrupts breastfeeding, and disturbs the baby's (and mother's) normal sleep patterns. In addition to this, male circumcision also affects the adult man's sexual partners. 
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JUNE 2015: Phimosis — One of the most frequently misdiagnosed conditions of the foreskin is phimosis. The reason for this misunderstanding is because the very paper that ended circumcision in England in 1949, recognizing that the attachment of the foreskin to the glans at birth is normal, also incorrectly said that the separation of the two structures is complete by the age of 3.  Read more >>

MAY 2015: The Ridged Band and Frenulum —
Despite the popular myth that the foreskin (or prepuce) is "just a flap of skin," it is actually a complex structure that plays a significant role in both penile protection and sensual/sexual enjoyment.  Read more >>

APRIL 2015: The Risks of Premature Forcible Foreskin Retraction — You protected your son from circumcision at birth and now you'll need to protect him from premature forcible foreskin retraction (PFFR). Too often, uninformed healthcare professionals and caregivers do not understand the anatomy, functions, development, and care of the normal penis.  
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